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St John Chrysostom icon

Item # 708
Starting At $2.95
  • Description
  • Price
  • Qty



  • 3" x 4" plaque
    708SM
  • $11.95
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  • 4.5" x 6" plaque
    708MD
  • $19.95
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  • 8" x 10" plaque
    708LG
  • $31.95
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  • 11" x 14" plaque
    708EX
  • $54.95
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  • 15" x 19" mounted
    708CP
  • $199.95
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  • 19" x 24" mounted
    708CH
  • $249.95
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  • 3" x 4" print
    708SMU
  • $2.95
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  • 4.5" x 6" print
    708MDU
  • $6.95
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  • 8" x 10" print
    708LGU
  • $12.95
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  • 11" x 14" print
    708EXU
  • $17.95
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  • 15" x 19" print
    708CPU
  • $49.95
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  • 19" x 24" print
    708CHU
  • $79.95
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  • 29" x 36" mounted
    708C36
  • $475.00
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  • 36" x 48" mounted
    708C48
  • $575.00
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  • 48" x 60" mounted
    708C60
  • $675.00
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  • 28" x 36" print
    708C36U
  • $140.00
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  • 38" X 48" print
    708C48U
  • $195.00
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  • 48" X 60" print
    708C60U
  • $250.00
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Description

John Chrysostom (347-407), Archbishop of Constantinople, shown in our St John Chrysostom Icon, was a notable Christian bishop and preacher from the fourth and fifth centuries in Syria and Constantinople. These saint icons portray a saint famous for eloquence in public speaking, his denunciation of abuse of authority in the Church and in the Roman Empire of the time, and for a divine liturgy attributed to him. After his death, he was named Chrysostom, which means "golden-mouthed." Take a moment to look at all of our saint icons available from Monastery Icons.

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$100.01-150.00 $22.95
$150.01-300.00 $29.95
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St. John Chrysostom

St. John Chrysostom

John Chrysostom (347-407), Archbishop of Constantinople, was a notable Christian bishop and preacher from the fourth and fifth centuries in Syria and Constantinople. He is famous for eloquence in public speaking, his denunciation of abuse of authority in the Church and in the Roman Empire of the time, and for a divine liturgy attributed to him. After his death he was named Chrysostom, which means "golden-mouthed."

St. John came into the world of Christian parents, about the year 344, in the city of Antioch. His mother, at the age of 20, was a model of virtue. He studied rhetoric under Libanius, a pagan, the most famous orator of the age. In 374, he began to lead the life of an anchorite in the mountains near Antioch, but in 386 the poor state of his health forced him to return to Antioch, where he was ordained a priest.

In 398, he was elevated to the See of Constantinople and became one of the greatest lights of the Church. But he had enemies in high places and some were ecclesiastics, not the least being Theophilus, Patriarch of Alexandria, who repented of this before he died. His most powerful enemy, however, was the empress Eudoxia, who was offended by the apostolic freedom of his discourses. Several accusations were brought against him in a pseudo-council, and he was sent into exile.

In the midst of his sufferings, like the apostle, St. Paul, whom he so greatly admired, he found the greatest peace and happiness. Pope Innocent I protested at this banishment, but to no avail. His enemies were not satisfied with the sufferings he had already endured, and they banished him still further, to Pythius, at the very extremity of the Empire. He died on his way there on September 14, 407.

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